Boondocking and dry camping sites in Montana

I do a lot of traveling around the state of Montana in my RV. From April until November I'm busy crisscrossing the state, usually from one corner to the other. One of the luxuries of the way I work is the freedom to pull up and move at a moment's notice to another locale and then loiter there for a period of time making photos of Montana locally. Some times I will stay in an area for weeks, and when I do it makes sense for me to stay at a RV park. Other times I'm just passing through or will only stay for a day or two, in which case I like to dry camp, which means I like to camp at places where there are no hookups or no costs for doing so. This is also called "boondocking" in the world of RVing. And the state of Montana with its many, many free places for RVers to camp is arguably the boondocking capital of the world.

Over the years I have collected data on where one might be able to boondock for free or inexpensively. These camping locations might include a fishing access site along the Yellowstone River, a city park in a quiet country town, or a parking lot of a retail location in one of Montana's largest cities. Above is a map of those Montana boondocking locations I have collected over the years. Now, if you plan on using this list, please remember, not all of the information is accurate. I have not stayed at each of these locations. So in other words, proceed at your own risk. But generally speaking it is a good starting point for finding places to camp with an RV in the state of Montana.

And since we are on the subject, and word of advice to small towns and businesses in the state. If you want more visitors, perhaps you too should think of how you can accommodate the travelers with RVs. It doesn't take much. While the vast majority of the campgrounds in my list offer few if any amenities, some offer restrooms, free WiFi, water, and in some cases even electricity. And in cases where such amenities are offered, guess where I'm staying. And guess where I'm spending my money. If you're a business and have a large parking lot, why not set up a few spots for RVs to park overnight. Sure, go ahead and charge them something, or maybe make it free to stay there if they spend a a certain amount of money in your business. I think you would be shocked how many travelers in campers and RVs will go out of their way to stay at a place that offers something like that. If every Montana community, especially those with RV parks, did a personal inventory of how they can better accommodate travelers in RVs, campers, and trailers, I guarantee more revenue and visitors to those communities.

For more free or inexpensive places to camp with an RV in Montana head on over to